OLDS: Sea Kayaking

For our last wilderness section the water and I met again. If you remember from my River post  the water is not my favorite place to be, and this definitely held true for sea kayaking as well.

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Prepping before leaving camp!

This section began with a ten hour roadtrip down to Florida, which was a blast. Once we arrived in FL we practiced wet exits from our boats and maneuvering in the water. Before setting off we also had to pack 7 days worth of food, our clothing, tents, sleeping bags, journals and bibles, camp stoves, etc and enough water to have a gallon a day per person into the two hatches on each of our kayaks.

We took this trip in the Everglades and camped on islands, ground sites (campsites attached to the mainland), and chickees, which are raised wooden platforms. The islands were by far the favorite places to camp. They were not as buggy or hot as the chickees and ground sites and it was fun to hang out on the beach and be able to shell hunt and build fires in the sand. On the islands you had to beware of raccoons though, as they are notorious for opening the hatches on kayaks and stealing the fresh water. Luckily, none of our water was stolen.

Sea kayaking was radically different from all the other wilderness trips we went on. Even basic things like packing and cooking were different. We had spent three months packing 100 liter backpacks, and now we had to pack the same items but into boats, and make sure no sand got into our stoves.

The environment was different as well; we spent all day paddling on the ocean rather than hanging out in the mountains under the trees. Instead of wondering if we’d run into deer and bears we saw sharks, turtles, lots of alligators, sting rays, manatees, and dolphins.

It was interesting to put our knowledge and previous experiences up to a completely different environment and activity.
It was challenging, really challenging, for all of us.
The ocean is tough; it pushes and shoves you and reflects the sun back up at you and makes you sandy and salty. Unlike when you’re walking in the woods, we were at the mercy of the tide, which could either help us along or push us back.

Along with the physical challenge, I found there was a mental and spiritual challenge as well. The whole atmosphere of OLDS was unreal: we were cut off from the realities and distractions of the outside world and as such could focus on our relationships with Christ and building community in a way that is difficult to replicate in the real world. I know that for the whole section having to go back to reality soon weighed on me. We were all a little apprehensive about going home and leaving that environment.

In total we spent 7 days out on the ocean. The first day we paddled out on a channel through mangroves to get to the open ocean. The mangroves produce these long green seed pods that we nicknamed cucumbers. I was in the back of the line everyday on this section with the sweep (which is the person designated to bring up the rear of the group) and on the first day we made a game out of seeing who could throw the most “cucumbers” into someone else’s boat. We camped on an island called Pavilion the first night, and it was one of my favorite campsites from the whole semester. On a walk around the island we found a dead sea turtle which had been preserved from the salty air and saw the bones of many horseshoe crabs.

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The undead turtle 

On day 2 I was Leader of the Day (LOD), which meant that I was supposed to stay in the lead and set the pace, but as previously stated I was in the back the entire time. For lunch we stopped off at an island and later landed at a campsite called Lopez River, which was a very swampy ground site.

10/10 would not recommend camping in a swamp.

On day 3 one of my friends noticed that I was paddling really ineffectively and showed me how to do it correctly, which served to fix some of my slow pace issues. This night we stayed on a chickee. This was a fascinating experience because we had to sit on top of our kayaks while they floated to unpack our things. Precariously balancing on top of water we knew was home to many alligators was quite thrilling. All ten of us were also confined to two small wooden platforms connected by a small walkway; we had to rub shoulders the whole time because there was literally no where else to go. Alligators also circled us almost the whole night, which again was both interesting and also slightly terrifying.

The next day we paddled to another island called Mormon Key to camp at. On the way we met up with the rest of our group for a game of frisbee because the tide was so low. We also saw a shark, sea turtle, and manatee, which for me was definitely a highlight. We had a lot of the day left after we landed so we were able to explore the island and have some time to relax and hang out on the beach. On this night we left our kayaks too close to the shoreline and had it not been for one of the instructors waking up in the middle of the night some of them would have floated away as the tide came up, which would have put a significant damper on the next morning.

Day 5 was both the worst and the best day of sea kayaking. We left early in an attempt to go out with the tide, but the tide and the wind actually ended up pushing against us almost the whole paddle. It was very hot, I was very slow, and almost the whole pod had gone on ahead. It was me and the sweep, by necessity, in the back of the pod. One of our friends ended up waiting for us and the three of us spent the last 40 or so minutes of the paddle goofing off and having a good time and creating the Low Tide Paddling Pod (LTPP!). It ended up becoming one of my favorite memories of the whole semester 🙂
Once we landed on the island (Pavilion again) we were able to walk out where the tide had gone out and see all manner of marine life: starfishes, conchs, scallops, crabs, little fish, and many other things I couldn’t identify.

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The Low Tide Paddling Pod!

The next day we had a zero day and were able to explore the island, contemplate our semester, go swimming, and just relax and hang out before the impending end of our time together.

On the last day we began paddling at 4:45am to beat the tide. We paddled under the stars and moon, which was very eerie but also very beautiful. One of the most spectacular things I’ve ever witnessed was the sun rising over the ocean while floating on a kayak in the ocean. There was no obstructions from seeing the sky come alive and turn the ocean into a fire for a little bit. This was another difficult day, and it concluded a difficult but overall growing and fun section.

Shortly after we ended paddling one of my friends asked me if it was worth it, despite all the challenges. And it was, every moment of strife and frustration and feeling like I couldn’t do it was worth it, because these are the things that make us grow and help us realize our strength and potential. And much like on other sections, I learned again to not doubt myself so much, to lean on the people around me for strength and encouragement, to loosen up and have fun, and most of all to give my frustrations to God and let Him take care of them.

On this section we studied Ephesians 6:10-23, which is the armor of God. This was very fitting and uplifting because we were able to dive into the tools God has given us to live for Him most effectively right before going back out into the real world.

Some of the highlights from my notes are:

Asking how the enemy attacks me and becoming aware of that to better combat it.

“Forgiveness is easier when we see our sins and the sins of others in the light of satan and the flesh at work.” -realize that we are all fallen and broken and have things to work on.

We are most effective when we are wearing the whole armor, not just pieces of it.

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OLDS: Caving

For our next section we went caving and had a small primitive skills section.
Caving was a blast because it was essentially playing in the mud, but underground.
For the first two days of caving we split into two groups. Our first cave was mostly mud and dirt to crawl through and throw at each other (which was the best part and also). The caves were so dark and cool and damp, the opening of the cave even felt like air conditioning coming from the ground. Inside the cave we threw mud at each other, crawled through the dirt, saw bats, and turned our lights off to experience real pitch black darkness (literal actual complete darkness). We also had to administer WFR skills because a substantial amount of mud ended up in my ear.

The second cave was a more technical experience in that there was less mud fights and more squeezing through tight spaces. I definitely enjoyed playing in the mud more, but exploring rock tunnels was fun too!

The last two caves were a mix of both mud slinging and rock squeezing. There was also a room where people made mud sculptures, a huge mud slide, and an underground river that we swam through to get out of the cave.

In the middle of caving we did a couple days of primitive skills. During this section we covered debris shelter building, basic fire assembling, map and compass reading and orienteering, and to top it all off we each killed a chicken (most of us with our hands) and then skinned them. The point of this section was to teach us very basic survival skills should we ever find ourselves in a situation without the proper gear and shelter. On the very first night of this section we were given a paper bag with various survival items and had to use them to build a shelter and start a fire. My partner and I had a magnesium stick and cotton swabs for our fire.

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Our primitive skills location

During this section we also had a 40 hour solo. We were each dropped off in a section of the woods about 200 yards from our neighbors. This time was meant for us to reflect on our semester, spend time with the Lord, and relax. It came at a very opportune moment for me as I was sick as a dog and needed some time to recover. In the beginning of the solo I had to set the tent up by myself, which was quite a time.

During the solo I spent the day alternating between praying, reading from the book of Jeremiah, journaling, writing poetry, and singing worship songs (there was also a couple naps thrown in). I also spent some time listing out sins I struggle with and praying for the Lord to help me deal with them. It was a refreshing and incredible time of simply sitting with God and allowing Him to speak to me and help me process different things.

 

One of the poems I wrote during the solo sums it up perfectly:

I lay on the leaves and
watch the wind push them
from the sky to the ground.
They fall and dance
with the clouds and sun
before becoming a carpet
and place for me to rest
my body and mind as
I think on a Creator
who laid these leaves
down years before for
me to feel His peace
from and see His
power and experience
a love deep enough
to let me feel the
wind on the leaves
and know He gave them to me to remind
me of Him and me
and Him in me

This whole semester showed me how nature can be an outlet for worshiping God and spending time with Him, but the solo really showed me the value of going out alone into a completely distraction free situation with nothing to do other than spend time with the Lord.
That being said, sleeping alone in the woods was a terrifying experience, but nevertheless I prevailed.

Our teachings primarily covered Ephesians 4, 5, and 6:1-9.
Ephesians 4 talked about speaking with authority and realizing that we, as believers, are a threat to the enemy. Also, not letting anger have a hold on us but realizing that God can handle our anger so we should give it to Him.

Ephesians 5 discussed the importance of being precise in the way we imitate Christ; we are to represent Christ in a way that shows people exactly who He is.

Ephesians 6 covered the topic of marriage. We discussed this in a group, which was a good way to hash out our thoughts and learn from each other.

Overall, caving was an experience unlike anything I had ever done before. Being underground is like being in a whole other world, not to mention sliding down mud and swimming in underground rivers was a blast.